Protected: How can some Minnesota Family Courts help families to separate

In my perfect world, ‘other lawyers’ and judges would be required to receive intensive training and ongoing continuing education in the mental health behavior patterns which drive most high-conflict divorce cases.   Many of the high-conflict cases I have handled have involved, on one level or another, personality disorders and/or substance abuse.  And, if one party in a family case suffers from one of these, the family system itself does. With change comes pain, and even in fairly functional families, one or both parents find that the goal of moving the children from an intact to a separated family as softly as possible cannot be met without help.  However, this is especially difficult when personality disorders or substance abuse is involved. Often these cases include domestic violence, verbal abuse, alienation, and even false allegations of child abuse.  Parties are wrapped up in their own hurt and anger and each feels the other is more at fault.  It is often not possible for people in such pain to see that their family as a system continues, albeit in a different form.   The nuclear family, as a closed system, is being changed, not eliminated. This concept can be difficult for any families, and families in the process of separating are no longer an intact family and can no longer be viewed as a closed system.    The family unit, formerly a tight, closed system where secrets and pains are kept silent, becomes a bright star at the center of a much larger solar system.  The bright and shiny private pains act like gravity, and can pull unwary attorneys, evaluators, teachers, relatives, and judges...
SEO MN